Suicide by Occupation in England: 2011 to 2015 – Office For National Statistics (ONS) Report Published March 2017

Suicide by Occupation in England: 2011 to 2015 – Office For National Statistics (ONS) Report Published March 2017:

The ONS has just published research on occupational suicide. The report analyses deaths from suicide in different occupational groups for people aged 20 to 64 years, based on deaths registered in England between 2011 and 2015.
Suicide is the leading cause of death in England and the UK in adults below the age of 50 and past research shows that some occupations are at particularly high risk. This new report describes recent analysis of deaths from suicide in different occupational groups among those aged 20 to 64 years. Such analysis can inform targeted suicide prevention measures and provide a broader understanding of influences on suicide.
Therefore this report will be of interest to Union Officials throughout the Union. The new report contains quite detailed occupational breakdowns for many types of jobs and sectors both for male and female workers. It shows that there are clear links between work and the risk of suicide which makes it a significant issue for Trade Unions.
The report also demolishes a lot of stereotypes and shows that suicide is more common among low paid or manual workers. For instance, individuals working in roles as managers, directors and senior officials – the highest paid occupation group – had the lowest risk of suicide. Among corporate managers and directors the risk of suicide was more than 70% lower for both sexes. Contrasting that were low skilled, low paid workers such as male labourers, particularly those working in construction, who had a three times higher risk of suicide than the national average.
Report Main points
There were 18,998 suicides in men and women aged between 20 and 64 years between 2011 and 2015, which constitutes a rate of around 12 deaths for every 100,000 people per year; for around 7 in 10 (13,232) of these suicides, an occupation was provided at the time of death registration.

Males working in the lowest-skilled occupations had a 44% higher risk of suicide than the male national average; the risk among males in skilled trades was 35% higher.

The risk of suicide among low-skilled male labourers, particularly those working in construction roles, was 3 times higher than the male national average.

For males working in skilled trades, the highest risk was among building finishing trades; particularly, plasterers and painters and decorators had more than double the risk of suicide than the male national average.

The risk of suicide was elevated for those in culture, media and sport occupations for males (20% higher than the male average) and females (69% higher); risk was highest among those working in artistic, literary and media occupations.

For females, the risk of suicide among health professionals was 24% higher than the female national average; this is largely explained by high suicide risk among female nurses.

Male and female carers had a risk of suicide that was almost twice the national average.

Females within the teaching and education profession had a lower risk of suicide but specifically for primary and nursery schoolteachers there was evidence of an elevated risk.

Individuals working in roles as managers, directors and senior officials – the highest paid occupation group – had the lowest risk of suicide. Among corporate managers and directors the risk of suicide was more than 70% lower for both sexes.

Suicide Definition
For this report, Suicide was defined using the National Statistics definition which includes both intentional self-harm and injury or poisoning of undetermined intent, based on the coroner’s findings.
Where to go for help – The Samaritans
The report advises those struggling to cope and needing someone to talk to, to either:-
Call Samaritans on their Helpline 116 123 or

e-mail jo@samaritans.org or

visit the Samaritans Website: http://www.samaritans.org

Samaritans are available round the clock, every single day of the year, providing a safe place for anyone struggling to cope, whoever they are, however they feel, whatever life has done to them.
Contact Details For “Samaritans” England, Scotland, Wales and Ireland
Samaritans Central Office England
Central Office telephone: +44 (0)20 8394 8300 

Central Office email: admin@samaritans.org 

Central Office postal address: The Upper Mill, Kingston Road, Ewell, Surrey KT17 2AF
Samaritans in Ireland
Ireland Office telephone: +353 1 6710071 

Ireland Office email: ireland@samaritans.org 

Ireland Office postal address: 4-5 Usher’s Court, Usher’s Quay, Dublin 8
Samaritans in Scotland
Scotland Office telephone: +44 (0)131 556 7058 

Scotland Office email: scotland@samaritans.org 

Scotland Office postal address: CBC House, 24 Canning Street, Edinburgh EH3 8EG
Samaritans in Wales
Wales Office telephone: +44 (0)29 2022 2008 

Wales Office email: wales@samaritans.org 

Wales Office postal address: Floor 2, 33-35 Cathedral Road, Cardiff CF11 9HB
A Pdf file copy of the ONS Report “Suicide by Occupation in England: 2011 to 2015” is Attached
Yours sincerely
Dave Joyce

National Health, Safety & Environment Officer
Email Attachments – Click to download
Attachment 1 – LTB175/17 Suicide by Occupation in England: 2011 to 2015 – Office For National Statistics (ONS) Report Published March 2017:

Attachment 2 – Suicide by occupation England 2011 to 2015

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